How to Effectively Continue Your Education in Economics

Whether you majored in economics or not, you can always continue your education in economics. Even if you haven’t studied economics at all, this article will be helpful for you. First, you need a good book that clearly explains the material. Then you need a study plan and stick to it. After that, it’s all about how much you study and for how long.



What Software and Programming Languages Are Most Beneficial for Economics Majors to Learn?

If you’re a loyal reader of mine, you know that I write a lot of articles giving college advice to economics majors about things like which computer is better to buy, why they should learn SQL, and other various skills needed to be competitive before they graduate. You may have read somewhere (or on here) that you need to learn various programming languages and become familiarized with plenty of software.

Here’s a comprehensive list of everything you should consider looking at dabbling with, perhaps even becoming skilled at a basic level in to add to your resume. Even if you’re an economics degree holder from a previous generation and you want to become more competitive, this article is for you.


Portland’s Real Estate Market: Is Domestic Migration Pushing Home Prices Up?

Portland, Oregon is known for craft beer, hipsters, great brunch spots, and overpriced homes. Over the past half century, Portland has seen homes go from less than $100,000 to over $300,000 on a small plot of land. Unless you’re from around the area, or unless you’ve understood that what happened in Portlandia is not an isolated event, you might not know that domestic migration from California played a role in this phenomenon.


What is SQL and Why Should I Learn it?

Are you studying economics or finance? Perhaps you’ve seen job postings requiring this funny thing people are pronouncing as “sequel,” but spelled S-Q-L. A quick Google search will tell you it’s a language that is used for accessing data stored in a database, but it’s still pretty confusing. Why would anybody want to use this if it’s this complicated? Aside from employers wanting you to know how to use it, here are some great reasons to learn SQL.


Skills Every Economics Major Should Learn Before Graduating

Now that I’m in my final year of my undergraduate career, I’m finding a lot of things I wish I would have at least been told about early on. I often find job postings that require skills that I don’t even learn in college unless I take a class that isn’t in the economics department or take the time to learn it on my own. Personally, I believe that advisors should be more upfront about this and should also be more proactive in asking about a student’s career aspirations. Until this happens, here’s a list of skills (based on my experience) that economics majors should start working on immediately, even if they’re a freshman or senior.

Most, if not all, of these skills will make you more competitive in many fields. But they are absolutely essential for many jobs in finance, research, analytics, and data management.


The Economics Behind Price Gouging

With all the hurricanes lately, I’ve seen plenty of people get upset about price gouging in areas where people are evacuating and/or areas where people are hunkering down. Based on what I’ve seen, most people find the practice immoral, especially when there’s a crisis. It seems to be that people don’t quite understand why price gouging is actually the moral thing to do in times of a crisis. Hopefully, my personal experience in Oregon with the wildfires will shed some light on this.


Why the University of Washington’s Study on Seattle’s Minimum Wage Increase is Not Flawed

Late last month, a team of economists at the University of Washington released their findings on the past couple minimum wage increases in Seattle. Unsurprisingly, this was covered by just about every news outlet. To my surprise, many are divided over what the Seattle economists found. Economists at UC Berkeley did their own study and had different findings. This led to a lot of people, including economists, calling the University of Washington’s study flawed. The only problem is that their study isn’t as flawed as critics claim.